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This collection celebrates the idiosyncratic twists that English men bring to the most formal of wardrobes.

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The caddish flamboyance of David Niven, whose book The Moon’s a Balloon reveals that the actor out as much imagination into expressing himself in words as in clothing; the simultaneously aloof and chumpish charm of the British princes in their youth, in particular Charles, who inherited from this father a dapper way with the conventions of royal dress; the ability to combine checks of different scales and carry it off, so expertly demonstrated by Edward VIII.

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These characters represented an enthusiasm for fashion among English men that freuently overlooked.

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A style where to dress down for the weekend is to dress up; an understaed uniform whose military roots still shine in the bars buttons of blazer and whose eccentricities are expressed in the patterns of the tie and the pocket square.

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‘It’s an aged-old cult of individuality whose heart still beats untouched in London’s Jermyn Street – home to traditional men’s clothing and grooming; home to dunhill, for over a century – and whose characters advertise their individual allegiances in the gang colours of the club tie.‘ -John Ray, Creative Directory dunhill

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The show soundtrack fuses 808 State’s ‘Pacific State’ with its brass-band reimagining by Jeremy Deller and military-parade drumming – an aural analogue to the collection demonstarting the off-beat ways in which English men enjoy twisting their own tradistions.

Alfred Dunhill (48 Jermyn St, London SW1Y 6LX)