We’re delighted to announce that the UK’s only specialist top-flight tribal art event will be held between 10-13 September 2014 at The Mall Galleries, St James, a stones throw from Jermyn Street. Exhibitors are all experts in this fascinating field, showcasing early tribal objects from around the globe, contemporary ethnographic art and photography, and publications dedicated to the subject.

web,KambaFineArt-Wisdom,KofiAllen
Artist: (Clive) Kofi Allen. Title: Wisdom – The Elder. Medium: Print onto textile.  Period: Contemporary. Kamba Fine Art P.O.A

This exciting new Fair for UK art collectors has doubled in size from its previous incarnation as group gallery show Tribal Perspectives, initiated by London-based dealer Bryan Reeves in 2007. It features a wider range of tribal art than ever before, encompassing early ceremonial and martial objects, adornment and for the first time ethnographic photography and contemporary art. The exhibitors are leading, well-respected experts in their field from the UK, Europe and Australia.

Jermyn Street: Tribal Art London at The Mall Galleries 

web,LisaTao- Northern Australian Aborigines, in Corroboree dress. Press photo,
Northern Australian Aborigines in Corroboree dress. Press photo circa 1950, 8 x 6in. Lisa Tao Fine Art P.O.A

With more space than at their former home in Cork Street, talks are now a component of Fair and include a book launch for The Magic of the Mask: The Bolon, by photographer and African art collector Michel de Combes. The author will be presenting two talks based on hispersonal journey to reveal the hidden magic of the mask of the remarkable Bolon maskers and mask-makers in a remote corner of Burkina Faso, West Africa.

19th century mask Magar tribe, Western Nepal Louis Nierijnck
A 19th century mask from the Magar tribe in Western Nepal. There is skin, hair and iron attached to the mask. Louis Nierijnck

Exhibited works for sale will include tribal masks, textiles, and a diverse array of special objects created for ritualistic or ceremonial use.  Jewellery and adornment is an important aspect of tribal art, as are arms and armour.  Beaded crowns and shell-work headpieces are shown with Aboriginal and African decorated shields. These pieces are appreciated for their decorative and sculptural effect as well as their cultural significance, and are chosen for their quality and authenticity.  Ethnographic photographs and contemporary art and photography are included for the first time.

Maori Chief with Moko tattoo Iles, Auckland, c1890. Gelatin silver print. Lisa Tao Fine Arts
Maori Chief with Moko tattoo. Photographer: Iles, Auckland. Period: c1890. Process: Gelatin Silver Print. Size: 7.5 x 5.25 in. Price £1000. Lisa Tao Fine Arts

Bryan Reeves comments: “The Mall Galleries is a good-sized West End venue that offers us the scope to display a wider range of tribal art than ever before. This gives us the impetus to invigorate the event, re-branding as Tribal Art London.  To our original core group we are delighted to welcome several specialists: David Malik, Rob Temple, Kamba Gallery, Michael Backman, Lisa Tao and Kapil Jariwala are all first time exhibitors, and will each bring a fresh aspect and new areas of interest to the displays.”

Ceremonial hat, Kaka tribe, Cameroon Bryan Reeves, Tribal Gathering
Ceremonial hat. Kaka  peoples, Cameroon.  £1200. Bryan Reeves/Tribal Gathering

A wide range of specialist books and publications are available for sale.  Tribal Art Londonwill be an important new focus for collectors and connoisseurs, travellers and adventurers, the enthusiastic and the learned.

Visit their website here for further details.

Mall Galleries (The Mall, London SW1)